Unpasteurized Goat Milk

Folks have been drinking raw goat’s milk since the 8th or 9th century B.C. In fact millions do around the globe on a daily basis. Raw milk is known to contain very rich fat and protein. Raw goat milk contains immunoglobulins, and the enzymes lipase and phosphatase and these are normally inactivated when pasteurizing milk. Also many beneficial bacteria, proteins and enzymes are also destroyed.

Raw goat milk Advocates claim that unpasteurized milk cures or prevents disease. But, many issues arise out of raw goat milk induced illness, one is animal husbandry and the other major one is dairy parlor cleanliness and sanitization regimes. Contamination can occur at the time of collection, processing, distribution or storage of milk. Hence, prudent and clean practices yield clean milk.

“Out of the box”  Generally, milk and dairy products are cornerstones of a healthy diet. However, if those products are consumed unpasteurized, they can present a serious health hazard because of possible contamination with pathogenic bacteria. Pasteurization is the process of heating milk to a high temperature for a short period and then rapid cooling, this kills off the various pathogens that can include campylobacter, escherichia, listeria, salmonella, yersinia, brucella and others. So, the choice is yours.

Lactose Intolerance

Basically, humans were never meant to digest cow milk or goat milk. Our bodies are meant to consume  mother’s milk for the first several months or years, and then move on to other foods. Many people only become lactose-intolerant as teens or adults, when the enzymes to digest any kind of milk stop being produced by the human digestive system.

Goat milk, like cow milk, contains the milk sugar, lactose, and may produce adverse reactions in lactose-intolerant individuals. Goat milk is only slightly lower in lactose than cow milk, with 4.1% milk solids as lactose versus 4.7% in cow milk, which may be a small advantage in lactose-intolerant persons.

The common symptoms of lactose intolerance are nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, abdominal cramps and passing of flatus. The degree of symptoms depends on the amount of milk consumed specifically, the amount of lactose and the degree to which our body is deficient in lactase enzyme. Intolerance adverse reactions are not life-threatening but may result in life long discomfort.

We must consider both milk allergy and lactose intolerance when adverse reactions occurred because both milk allergy and lactose intolerance can exist simultaneously. A correct diagnosis must be made and properly followed up, as the treatment, dietary avoidance, is often very difficult and if incorrectly applied can lead to vitamin deficiencies or malnutrition.

Goat Milk Calcium

Goat milk is a very good source of calcium. Calcium is widely recognized for its role in maintaining the strength and density of bones. In a process known as bone mineralization, calcium and phosphorus join to form calcium phosphate. Calcium phosphate is a major component of the mineral complex (called hydroxyapatite) that gives structure and strength to bones.

A cup of goat’s milk supplies 32.6% of the daily value for calcium along with 27.0% of the DV for phosphorus. In recent studies, goat milk calcium has shown to:

  • Reduce PMS symptoms during the the second half of the menstrual cycle
  • Help prevent the bone loss that can occur as a result of menopause or certain conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis
  • Help prevent recurrent migraine headaches
  • Help protect colon cells from cancer-causing chemicals

This mineral does more then just stronger bones and teeth. Calcium also plays vital role in many other vital physiological activities, including cell membrane function, nerve conduction, muscle contraction, regulation of enzyme activity, blood clotting and blood pressure regulation. Since these activities are essential to life, the body utilizes complex regulatory systems to tightly control the amount of calcium in the blood, so that sufficient calcium is always available. As a result, when dietary intake of calcium is too low to maintain adequate blood levels of calcium, calcium stores are drawn out of the bones to maintain normal blood concentrations.

Dairy Foods Better than Calcium Supplements for Growing Girls’ Bones

According to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,  young girls going through the rapid growth spurt of puberty, getting calcium from dairy products, such as goat milk, may be better for building bones and teeth than taking a calcium supplement.

Goat Milk Health Benefits

Goat Milk is gaining popularity in the United States and in most parts of the world, Goat milk is the popular choice besides cow milk. Goat milk is available all year round in retail stores and market. If you have not tried drinking goat milk, you may find that it taste strange, sightly sweet and at times salty undertone. Goat milk can sometimes be consume as another option if individual or infant is allergy to cow milk. However, parents of infants should consult their pediatrician or other qualified health-care practitioner for best alternative.

Goat milk contains high calcium and Tryptophan. Tryptophan is one of the 20 standard amino acids, as well as an essential amino acid required in the human body. Goat milk is also a good source of protein, potassium, phosphorus and riboflavin, vitamin D, B-6 and vitamin B-12. Research has found some anti-inflammatory compounds (short-chain sugar molecules called oligosaccharides) to be present in goat milk. Oligosaccharides is know to make goat milk easier to digest, especially in the case of compromised intestinal function.

In recent animal studies, goat milk has also been shown to enhance the metabolism of both iron and copper, especially when there are problems with absorption of minerals in the digestive tract. These benefits and others are likely to play vital role in the tolerability of goat milk. As for older children and adults, besides an excellent calcium-rich which is widely recognized for its role in maintaining the strength and density of bones and teeth, goat milk may help to reduce some of the recurrent ear infections, asthma, eczema, and even rheumatoid arthritis. Goat milk can also prevent disease such as anemia.

Milk, Goat

The 1st. of June every year is a very special day when the whole world comes together to celebrate the goodness of milk and its importance as a global food source. Started by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 2001, the recognition of the World Milk Day continues to grow as it is celebrated by more and more countries every year. Nothing compares to the goodness of milk. It is the best source for calcium and vitamin D – two nutrients essential for building strong bones and teeth. It is also rich in protein which is important for building and repairing body tissues. In fact, milk is regarded as one of the most nutritionally complete foods available on our planet and has been part of the human diet for thousands of years.

Although daily cows produce the greatest amount of world milk supply mostly from developed countries, more people drink the milk of goats than milk of any other single species on a world wide basis. Dairy goat farming is a vital sector of agricultural businesses in developed countries of the Mediterranean region such as France, Italy, Spain and Greece. Production of goat milk and its product of cheeses and yogurt is also a valued part of the total dairy industry in developed countries, where it provides diversity to sophisticated consumer tastes, and support people with medical afflictions, like allergies and gastrointestinal disorders, who needs alternative dairy products.

However, production of goat milk is equally  important in countries of the underdeveloped world, where it provides basic nutrition and subsistence to the rural people, which are the majority of their populations. Home consumption of goat milk is important in the prevention of under nutrition and malnutrition, since milk is the superior source of calcium and protein, and to millions of rural poor people cow milk is not available or not affordable. A daily minimum supply of 1000 mg calcium per person is widely recommended, as is a minimum of 60 g protein from animal sources. Domestic goat derive from Central Asia is known as Capra hircus.

Goats milk is also great for your skin because it is rich in vitamins, minerals, proteins as well as high in lactic acid which helps exfoliate dead skin cells and soften your skin. Thus, goat milk serves in a general way four types of market around the world, such as (1) Home Consumption, (2) Specialty gourmet interests, (3) Medical needs, and (4) Skin Care Products.