Fried Chevre Recipe

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This recipe is simple. You can use either homemade chevre or buy from the grocery store. If you are using homemade chevre, it will be best if you let it drain until it is fairly dry and crumbly, like chevre purchased from the store. That way, it will stick together better when you form the patties.

Directions:

Mold small scoops of chevre cheese into patties. I prefer a size that is about 1 1/2″ in diameter, but you can use smaller or larger as preferred. Dip each patty in a well-beaten egg, and then roll in bread crumbs.

You can generally use Italian bread crumbs, because of the seasoning, but you can use plain, or add your own seasonings. *Optional – You could also add a little parmesan cheese to the bread crumbs for more flavor.

Fry in hot vegetable oil for a few seconds until the bread crumb coating has browned. Remove from the oil, and drain on a paper towel.

Transfer to a serving platter, and garnish, if desired.

It does not get any easier than that!

This warm goat cheese makes a fantastic appetizer. And when you bite a piece of fried cheese, a crispy bread crumb coating gives way to creamy, warm goat cheese that fills your mouth with a delightful flavor.

And, once you have tried the plain fried Goat Cheese, your imagination will start soaring! Experiment with your own combinations to find your favorite taste or add your favorite flavor combination to create an entirely new taste sensation.

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How To Make Saint Maure

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Making Saint Maure is trying something really fun, getting moldy. Once you try this moldy Chevre, you may never go back to plain Chevre again. You will need molds like in plastic containers with holes in the bottom, to make this cheese.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 gallon of fresh goat milk or raw, unpasteurized goat milk
  • 1 oz. mesophilic culture
  • liquid rennet
  • 1/8 tsp. of white mold powder (Penicillium Candidum).

Special supplies:

  • 5 Chevre molds
  • draining mats

Remember to sterilize all your equipment before you begin.

In a stainless steel pot, warm the milk to 72°.

Add the culture, white mold powder and stir well. Now you need to add 1/5 of a drop of rennet. Or measure out 5 Tablespoons of water into a small cup. Add to the water 1 drop of liquid rennet and stir well. Now measure out 1 Tablespoon of the rennet dilution (this one Tablespoon contains 1/5 of a drop of rennet) and add it to the milk. Stir well.

Cover the milk and place the pot somewhere that it can sit undisturbed and will stay about 72° for about 18 hours. But, you can let it go for 24 hours. What you do is place the pot in the cold oven until the next day.

When the milk has coagulated, you are ready to mold the cheese.

To make moldy cheeses:

Pour off any whey that has separated from the curd. Place your molds on a rack over a large baking pan. A lot of whey will drain from your cheese, and you will need a large pan to catch it. Carefully ladle the curds into the molds. Let the curds drain for two days at room temperature.

After the cheese has drained you can carefully unmold them into your hand. Sprinkle all the sides of the cheese with a little Kosher salt. When you unmold the cheeses, they may already have started to develop their fuzz.

For this aging, you will need some draining mats. For smaller weave in the mat, you can use a plastic craft “canvas” and it is available at Wal-Mart. If you want a larger hole in your drying rack, use “egg crate”. It comes in a large sheet intended for use in suspended ceilings and is available at home improvement stores. You can use these two “mats” separately and in combination to dry and age cheeses.

To age your Chevre, place them on a drying mat cut smaller than a large gallon size ziplock freezer bag. Slip the mat with the cheeses into a gallon ziplock bag, blow up the bag and seal it. Now you have a little aging “cave”. Let the cheeses age on the counter for a few more days and then move them into your cheese aging fridge. Here they continue to fuzz up for a few weeks. You can eat your little fuzzies at any time, but try to let them age a couple weeks to develop a good covering of mold.

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Meyenberg Goat Milk Products Valley Goat Cheddar – Aged, 8-Ounce Packages (Pack of 5)

Homemade Chevre

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Chevre, means “goat cheese” in French. It is a soft, molded, fresh cheese. It has a texture similar to cream cheese, though slightly drier, and is lighter and fluffier. You can usually substitute chevre in recipes that call for cream cheese or ricotta.

It is quite simple to make and does not require a lot of special utensils. It also does not consume a lot of goat milk or time to make and it is one of the simplest.

You can make this cheese as “bag cheese” or molded. If you wish to mold it, you will need molds like in plastic containers with holes in the bottom, to make this cheese.

Once you have your molds, you are ready to make your very own Chevre.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 gallon of fresh goat milk or raw, unpasteurized goat milk
  • 1 oz. mesophilic culture
  • liquid rennet

Special supplies:

  • 5 Chevre molds, or
  • Fine cheese cloth (butter muslin)

Remember to sterilize all your equipment before you begin.

In a stainless steel pot, warm the milk to 72°.

Add the culture and stir well. Now you need to add 1/5 of a drop of rennet. Or measure out 5 Tablespoons of water into a small cup. Add to the water 1 drop of liquid rennet and stir well. Now measure out 1 Tablespoon of the rennet dilution (this one Tablespoon contains 1/5 of a drop of rennet) and add it to the milk. Stir well.

Cover the milk and place the pot somewhere that it can sit undisturbed and will stay about 72° for about 18 hours. But, you can let it go for 24 hours. What you do is place the pot in the cold oven until the next day.

When the milk has coagulated, you are ready to drain the curds or mold the cheese.

How to make  “bag cheese” ?

Pour the curds into a cheesecloth lined colander. Tie up the ends and hang the bag and let drain 6-8 hours. When it is thickened, salt to taste and enjoy. Unblended, this cheese substitutes nicely for cream cheese.

How to make  molded cheeses ?
Pour off any whey that has separated from the curd. Place your molds on a rack over a large baking pan. A lot of whey will drain from your cheese, and you will need a large pan to catch it. Carefully ladle the curds into the molds.

Let the curds drain for two days at room temperature or you could drain the cheese in the fridge if there is enough space.

After the cheese has drained you can carefully unmold them into your hand. Sprinkle all the sides of the cheese with a little Kosher salt and wrap them in plastic wrap. The cheese will keep for about 2 weeks in the fridge.

How to enjoy Homemade Chevre?

The best way to enjoy your homemade Chevre is on crackers. It can also be used in any recipe calling for “goat cheese” and can be substituted for cream cheese.

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Goat Milk Cheese

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Goat milk cheese is a food consisting of proteins and fat from goat milk. It is produced by coagulation of the milk protein casein. Typically, the goat milk is acidified and the addition of rennet causes coagulation. The solids are then separated and pressed into final form. Some cheeses also contain mould either on the outer rind or throughout. It has a different color and structure and taste than that of regular cheese. It is usually white and breaks apart quickly.

Goat milk is highly suitable for the production of different varieties of soft cheeses that are popular in Europe, France, USA, Spain, Yugoslavia, Italy etc. The goat milk can be admixed with buffalo milk at 50:50 level for the manufacture of Mozzarella cheese. The cheese made from goat milk had higher retention of moisture and lower sodium content, higher fat and dry matter content and the organoleptic quality is definitely superior when compared with cow milk cheese.

In Italy, cheese made from goat milk are either consumed fresh or ripened for 2 months. For ripening the cheese, white or blue moulds are used in order to produce a strong flavour and proper rind formation. The cheese made from goat milk is known for the desirable sharp flavour due to the presence of higher concentration of medium chain fatty acids. In many states of European Union, the goat milk cheese is marketed as premium quality.

Trials have been carried out by mixing 10-25% of goat milk in buffalo milk to produce cheddar cheese, which developed sharp and balanced flavour within 6 months of ripening. At 15% replacement in buffalo milk, the Gouda cheese developed pronounced flavour.  Domiati cheese made from fresh goat milk and ripened for 90 days exhibited that the rennet type had little effect on the yield, acidity, moisture content, fat, salt, ratio between soluble nitrogen to total nitrogen, total volatile fatty acids and non protein nitrogen of cheese.

Summer is also the natural season for fresh goat milk cheese such as chevre. A word about storing cheeses in warm weather. All of them should be kept in the refrigerator. Creamy or sticky fresh goat cheese should first be wrapped tightly in plastic wrap. Be sure to use a fresh sheet of wrapping paper each time you rewrap the cheese.

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