Cream Cheese Recipe

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This recipe is a full-fat version for making cream cheese that uses only goat milk cream. If you prefer a lighter version, you can substitute part of the cream with goat milk.

Anyway, I do not recommend using less than half cream, though, in order to get the best flavor and texture for homemade cream cheese.

The small amount of rennet used to make cream cheese is what gives it the additional firmness over other soft cheeses such as quark or cottage cheese. Remember, always add liquid rennet to a few tablespoons of water first and never directly to the milk.

Ingredients

  • 1 quart goat milk cream
  • 2 Tbsp. cultured buttermilk
  • 1 drop double strength liquid rennet dissolved in 2 Tbsp. Water

In a stainless steel pan, warm the cream to about 70° F, stirring to ensure even heating. Add the buttermilk, and mix thoroughly. Stir in the rennet and water mixture, and again mix thoroughly.

Cover the pot and allow to sit for 24 hours at room temperature. Sprinkle about 1/2 tsp. salt over the mixture, and then whisk lightly to mix.

Pour the cream into a cheese cloth lined colander placed over a bowl to save the whey for future  use. Let drain for about 12 hours.

At that time, you can collect the cream cheese from the cheesecloth and place into a bowl for storage in the fridge.

Alternatively, if you’d like a drier, molded cheese, you can place the cream cheese into a cheese mold or a small plastic container with holes in the bottom to further drain and increase the body of the cheese.

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Whole Milk RICOTTA Cheese Recipe

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Though it is not traditional but,  it is nice to be able to make ricotta out of plain whole goat milk you can buy at the store. This Ricotta cheese  will be drier and not as smooth and creamy as the traditional old-Fashioned Ricotta cheese. Anyway, it tastes great and can be used as a ricotta substitute in most recipes.

Ingredients:

  • 2 quarts whole goat milk
  • 3 Tablespoons white vinegar or ¼ Cup fresh, lemon juice
  • ¼ tsp – ½ tsp salt to taste

In a heavy pot, over direct heat, heat 2 quarts of whole goat milk to 200°. Add 3 Tablespoons of white vinegar or 1/4 Cup of fresh, strained lemon juice. Make sure to bring the temperature back up to 200°. You will realize that very tiny white particles called albumin protein, floating in the whey. The heat and acid from the ripe whey has precipitated the protein.

Remove the pot from the heat and set it, covered, to rest undisturbed for about 15 minutes.

Line a colander with very fine cheesecloth, called “butter muslin”. You must use a very fine cloth here, or your cheese will pass through the regular cloth. If you do not have fine cheesecloth, use a clean cotton cloth. Place the colander over a big pot so you can save the whey and carefully pour the whey into the colander. Be very careful because the liquid is hot. Tie the ends of the cheesecloth together and hang the ricotta to drain for an hour or so because the longer you hang it, the drier your finished cheese will be.

When it has drained, place the ricotta cheese  in a bowl, break up, stir and add salt to taste. This Ricotta cheese will keep for about a week in the fridge.

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Cottage Cheese with Raw Goat Milk

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Bring the milk to 86° and add the buttermilk. Stir well and let set, to ripen, for 1 hour. Add the rennet and stir briskly for 15 seconds. Cover the pot and let the milk set for 45 minutes, or until you get a clean break. Hold the milk at a temperature of 86° for the entire time.

Cut the curds into 1/2″ pieces with a stainless steel knife. This always seem to be the trickiest part of cheese making, but take your time, and don’t worry if all the curds are cut not exactly 1/2″. After you have cut the curds, do not stir them yet. Let them rest, undisturbed for 10 minutes.

Now you can stir the curds gently and cut any that you had missed. What you are doing here is making the size cottage cheese curd you like. Raise the temperature of the curds to 95° over the next 20 minutes, stirring occasionally so the curds do not stick together. Let the curds settle for 5 minutes, undisturbed.

Drain the the whey until it in level with the curds (about 1/2-3/4 of the whey). Add enough cold water to lower the temp to 85°. Stir as you add the water. Now, leave the curds in this cheese 85° water/whey for 10 minutes, stirring with your hand occasionally so that the curds don’t stick together.

Pour the curds into a colander and let drain. Carefully stir occasionally so it dose not stick together. After about 1/2 hour, you can carefully separate or break up the curds into a bowl and salt to taste. Cover and let sit in the fridge at least 2 days. The curds may be squeaky at first, but with the aging, they loose their squeak.

This is a dry cottage cheese, if you like it wet, you may add some cream to it.

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 gallons raw goat milk
  • 1 cup. Buttermilk
  • 1/2 tablespoon  liquid rennet,  dissolved in 1/4  cup water
  • 1-2 teaspoons  kosher salt

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