How To Enjoy Paneer

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Now that you have this rubbery ball of cheese, what do you do with it or how do you enjoy it? Paneer is like tofu,  it will take on the flavor of the food it is cooked with. Just cut it into bite-sized cubes and throw it into chili or spaghetti.  If you love pasta cooked in whey you can always save whey just for this purpose. Try serving your chili over vermicelli cooked in whey, topped with a sprinkle of cheese, some sprouts and a dollop of goat yogurt.

You could use Paneer as a meat extender or replacement. If you are a vegetarian, you can use a lot of Paneer. You make “chicken a la king” using cubes of Paneer instead of meat. A quick dinner is mac’n cheese, made from a box, but also add onions, Paneer cubes, peas and buttermilk. When you make taco meat, cut it up in tiny cubes and simmer it with the meat for about an hour.

You can also marinade Paneer and throw it on top of salads or use it in stir-fry. Paneer is really in its element when used in curry. Serve the curry over rice cooked with whey instead of water and add a handful of raisins and a clove to the rice as well to make it really authentic.

There are endless uses for Paneer, so make some of this quick and easy cheese and experiment for yourself. Enjoy!

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Ricotta Cheese

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Grocery & Gourmet Food

Dairy, Cheese & Eggs

Artisan Cheese

Cottage Cheese

Cream Cheese

Milk & Cream

Ricotta cheese is a soft, slightly sweet, mild fresh cheese. Ricotta is similar in appearance to cottage cheese, but has a much smaller, grainier curd and slightly sweeter taste. Ricotta in Italian means “cooked again,” a reference to the fact that it is traditionally made from whey produced from making other cheeses, like mozzarella, feta or provolone.

The original cheese-making process removes the majority of the casein protein from the goat milk (the cheese) leaving behind the liquid whey portion.When left at room temperature, the original inoculating bacteria continue to act upon the remaining lactose in the whey, converting it to lactic acid, and further lowering the pH of the liquid. The lower pH reduces the solubility of the small amount of remaining protein in the whey. Heating the whey then causes the protein to precipitate out as a very fine-grained curd.

As ricotta is basically the “leftovers” from cheese-making, it takes a significant amount of whey to produce a small amount of ricotta. In view of this, some recipes call for the addition of whole milk to the whey in order to increase the yield.

Ricotta may be best known in the United States as an ingredient in lasagna and ravioli, but it also serves as the basis for many desserts, like cannoli and cheesecake. Ricotta can also be served in a manner similar to a pudding by adding sweeteners and flavorings and stirring until smooth.

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Buttermilk Dairy Milk Eggnog Flavored Milk Heavy Cream Light Cream Whipping Cream

Sour Cream Whipped Toppings Yogurt Packaged Cheese Feta Mozzarella Parmesan Provolone Ricotta Vegetarian Blue Cheese Cheddar Cheese Blends Almond Milk Soy Milk Milk Substitutes Butter & Margarine Cheese Assortments & Samplers

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