Handmade Goat Milk Soap

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    *Take Note: Wear rubber gloves when handling lye.

    Making soap of any kind is fairly simple. Goat milk soap is no exception. Homemade soap can be a welcome addition to anyone bathing routine, especially for someone with sensitive skin. Goat milk soap is a very moisturizing, soft soap and not that difficult to make. Follow some simple instructions and make goat milk soap for home use or to give away as gifts.

    Lye and Borax are available at the grocery stores, make sure that the lye can states 100 per cent lye. Before you buy the lye, shake the can and listen to it to make sure it is free flowing for easy handling, and has no lumps in it. Borax – this boots cleaning ability, soften the water and helps with suds-ing. Liquid Glycerin is available at drug stores. Glycerin gives the soap more moisturizing qualities.

    Lye heats the milk up very hot; the sugar in the milk will “caramelize” and the soap will be tan in color. Soap made with 100% lard will not lather a whole lot, but make a good cleaning, very gentle, moisturizing soap. Lathering and cleaning ability have nothing to do with one another.

    Use a stainless steel pot for your soap making. Very slowly pour the lye into the ice cold milk, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. The milk will heat up very quickly due to the addition of the lye. If you add the lye too fast, the milk may scorch and curdle. The milk will turn an orange color and curdle a little bit but do not worry, add the honey. Let the mixture cool down to 85°.

    While the lye and milk mixture is cooling, warm the lard to 90°. Slowly pour the lard into the lye and milk mixture, stirring constantly, and add the glycerin and borax.

    The best thing to stir soap with is an electric hand held “stick blender” because you really need to stir the soap mixture to get it to “trace”. The slower your stirring is, the longer it will take to trace. You cannot just stop or go away and let it sit because if you do not stir constantly, the soap will never “trace”.

    Add the glycerin and borax and keep stirring until the mixture starts to thicken like thin pudding nice “traces”. The mixture “traces” when a small amount of the solution drizzled across the top of the main solution’s surface leaves a faint pattern before sinking back into the mass. A trace should be reached within 10 to 20 minutes of hand stirring, or 5 to 10 minutes of stirring with a “stick blender”.

    Add any essential oils you wish to add to the soap at this point. Stir it in well.

    Pour the mixture into your molds. Cover the top of the molds with a cloth such as cheesecloth and then cover it with a blanket. Leave it undisturbed overnight.

    The next day you can cut the soap into bars using fishing line. Stack the bars on a cookie sheet lined with a large paper bag. It is not ready to use yet; the mixture needs to saponify and cure. Let the soap cure by air-drying it for at least 6 weeks before using or giving away.

    • 3 pints of ice cold goat milk
    • 1 12 oz. can of Red Devil Lye
    • 5 1/2 pounds of lard
    • 2 oz. glycerin
    • 2 Tablespoon borax
    • 1/3 Cup Honey

    Grocery & Gourmet Food

    Dairy, Cheese & Eggs

    Artisan Cheese

    Cottage Cheese

    Cream Cheese

    Milk & Cream

    Goat Milk Whey Powder

    Buttermilk Dairy Milk Eggnog Flavored Milk Heavy Cream Light Cream Whipping Cream

    Sour Cream Whipped Toppings Yogurt Packaged Cheese Feta Mozzarella Parmesan Provolone Ricotta Vegetarian Blue Cheese Cheddar Cheese Blends Almond Milk Soy Milk Milk Substitutes Butter & Margarine Cheese Assortments & Samplers

    Goat milk whey powder is a new and unique product!

    Suppliers of whey powder offer a mixed whey powder, made from whey powder based on different sorts of milk. But  goat milk whey powder is made from pure goat milk whey without the additions of other sorts of milk whey powder.

    Goat whey powder is obtained by concentrating and drying the whey produced during the manufacture of goat cheese. If so required, the whey can be partially desalted prior to drying.

    Goat milk whey powder and partially desalted goat milk whey powder can be used as an ingredient in children’s and dietary foods, in dairy products,  such as yoghurt, in bakery products, and in confectionery.

    Grocery & Gourmet Food

    Dairy, Cheese & Eggs

    Artisan Cheese

    Cottage Cheese

    Cream Cheese

    Milk & Cream

    Full Cream Goat Milk Powder

    Grocery & Gourmet Food

    Dairy, Cheese & Eggs

    Artisan Cheese

    Cottage Cheese

    Cream Cheese

    Milk & Cream

    The high fat content of full cream goat milk powder imparts it with a creamy flavor, and renders it suitable for a wide range of applications in the food industry.

    Full cream goat milk powder is manufactured by spray-drying whole fresh goat milk. The goat milk powder contains the natural content of fat and protein present at the time the goat milk is spray-dried. These contents are subject to seasonal fluctuation. However the process can be modified to incorporate the standardization of the fat and protein content, should this be required for a specific application.

    Full cream goat milk powder is suitable for use in a wide variety of foods such as, for example, dairy drinks and desserts, cheese, ice-cream, infant and follow-on formula, nutritional supplements and tablets.

    Buttermilk Dairy Milk Eggnog Flavored Milk Heavy Cream Light Cream Whipping Cream

    Sour Cream Whipped Toppings Yogurt Packaged Cheese Feta Mozzarella Parmesan Provolone Ricotta Vegetarian Blue Cheese Cheddar Cheese Blends Almond Milk Soy Milk Milk Substitutes Butter & Margarine Cheese Assortments & Samplers

    Dairy Goat Products

    Although Goat milk is similar to cow milk in its basic composition, the significance of Goat milk and it’s products in human nutrition and well-being can never be underestimated. Dairy Goat products provides essential nutrients in human diet, as well as income sources for the survival of mankind in ecosystems of many parts of the world. The contribution of dairy goat products are also greatly valued by those who have cow milk allergy and other nutritional diseases. Dairy Goat Products include  Fluid milk, Powdered milk, Yogurt, Evaporated milk, Soft cheese, Hard cheese, and Cultured Goat Milk Products comprise of Buttermilk, Sour Dip, Acidophilus, Yogurt, Kefir.

    Cheese

    Cheeses hold the greatest economic value among all manufactured goat milk products. According to the Agriculture Handbook of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, there are more then 400 varieties of goat cheese and lists more then 800 names of cheeses, many of which are made from goat milk or combination of goat milk with cow, buffalo or sheep milk.

    The general procedures of cheeses manufacturing are:-

    • Preparation of goat milk
    • Standardizing the milk
    • Setting the temperature
    • Adding starter cultures
    • Adding rennet
    • Cutting curds
    • Cooking
    • Draining whey
    • Salting
    • Hooping
    • Pressing
    • Packaging
    • Aging

    Take Note: *Soft cheese are made by natural draining without pressing.

    Evaporated and Powdered Goat Milk

    Today, Evaporated and Powdered Goat milk are manufactured and marketed in most part of the world besides the United States. Evaporation is usually done under reduced pressure, primarily to allow boiling at a lower temperature to prevent heat damage. Powdered products available include Whole milk, Skim milk, Whey and infant foods.

    Frozen Products.

    Ice cream and frozen yogurt are manufactures from goat milk and cream. The popular flavor choice formulations of goat milk ice cream are Chocolate, Strawberry, French vanilla, Blueberries and Cream and combination with fruits or other ingredients.

    Many varieties contain sugar although some are made with other sweeteners. In some cases, artificial flavorings and color is also used. This mixture is stirred slowly while cooling to prevent large ice crystals from forming. The result is a delicious and smoothly textured ice-cream.

    Cultured Goat Milk Products

    Goat Milk Yogurt

    Goat milk yogurt is one of the major cultured products. It may be made from low-fat, skim or whole milk. Goat milk yogurt can be made in a similar manner to the cow counterpart. It is made essentially the same way as buttermilk, but a different combination of microorganisms is cultured at a higher incubation temperature. Goat milk yogurt is softer and less viscous and often lacks the typical flavor of cow yogurt.

    The basic processing procedures of Goat Milk Yogurt include:-

    • Preparation of goat milk
    • Standardization (standardized to 1.0 – 1.7% fat)
    • Pasteurization (72 degree Celsius for 20 second)
    • Cool the pasteurized mix to 46.7 degree Celsius and hold in vat for up to  15 minutes.
    • Inoculation – 45 degree Celsius ( carefully introduce into warm milk or milk mixes 1.25% by weight of active Lactobacillus bulgaricus culture.
    • Packaging (set yogurt)
    • Incubation (permit filled containers to remain in room at 45 degree Celsius for 3 – 5 hours or until a firm, smooth gel has formed to pH4.5
    • Chilling (yogurt is chilled to 7.2 degree Celsius in less than 1 hour)
    • Storage and Distribution (store the containers of yogurt at 4.4 degree Celsius or lower, the shelf life at this temperature is 30 to 60 days).

    Buttermilk

    Buttermilk is usually made from skim milk (less than 0.5% fat) using the by-product from churning butter out of sour cream. Yogurt is made from whole milk (3.25% fat), low fat milk (0.5 to 2.5% fat) or skim milk. Sour cream must contain 18% fat in most states. Acidophilus milk can be made by the activity of L. acidophilus, which is capable of converting a greater proportion of the lactose to lactic acid (2%).

    Kefir

    Kefir is an acidic, slightly foamy product made from pasteurized and fat-standardized or decreamed goat milk that has passed through a combined acidic and alcoholic fermentation of symbiotic lactic acid bacteria and yeast kefir grains. The finished product Kefir, contains 0.6 to 0.8% lactic acid and 0.5 to 1.0% alcohol.

    Other Cultured Goat Milk Products

    Ghee is an Indian clarified butterfat product manufactured by fermenting whole milk into curd and churning out the butter, followed by heat clarification at 105 – 145 degree C.

    Additionally, good goat milk products made in India include Chhana, Khoa and Paneer (a cheese). Chhana is an acid and heat-coagulated milk product and a chhana-based sweet is made by kneading chhana and cooking it in sugar syrup over medium heat. Khoa is a heat-desiccated indigenous goat milk product used for various sweets or candy.