Lactose Intolerance

Basically, humans were never meant to digest cow milk or goat milk. Our bodies are meant to consumeĀ  mother’s milk for the first several months or years, and then move on to other foods. Many people only become lactose-intolerant as teens or adults, when the enzymes to digest any kind of milk stop being produced by the human digestive system.

Goat milk, like cow milk, contains the milk sugar, lactose, and may produce adverse reactions in lactose-intolerant individuals. Goat milk is only slightly lower in lactose than cow milk, with 4.1% milk solids as lactose versus 4.7% in cow milk, which may be a small advantage in lactose-intolerant persons.

The common symptoms of lactose intolerance are nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, abdominal cramps and passing of flatus. The degree of symptoms depends on the amount of milk consumed specifically, the amount of lactose and the degree to which our body is deficient in lactase enzyme. Intolerance adverse reactions are not life-threatening but may result in life long discomfort.

We must consider both milk allergy and lactose intolerance when adverse reactions occurred because both milk allergy and lactose intolerance can exist simultaneously. A correct diagnosis must be made and properly followed up, as the treatment, dietary avoidance, is often very difficult and if incorrectly applied can lead to vitamin deficiencies or malnutrition.